On the eve of another mentorship award, an open letter to Lorelei

Dear Lorelei,

Nearly 5 years ago, Stella Ng and I decided to organize the process of nominating you for the Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry’s Distinguished Leader award. We brought the idea to Mark Goldszmidt and he was quick to get the ball rolling, whatever we needed he would make it happen.

As it goes with these types of awards, it was a layered process and we knew it would be a big job. Many letters of endorsement would need to be written, documents signed, etc. We were, of course, glad– but unsurprised–that everyone we approached enthusiastically agreed to write a letter. In fact, it came to a point where we had too many offers and needed a backup list. Physicians, research scientists, and even a former Dean wrote on your behalf.

As it also goes with these types of awards, you would not have read my letter, but with the news you have won yet another mentorship award–the 2017 Meredith Marks award!–I thought I would post it online for you in a de-identified format.

I’ve had the pleasure of working with Dr. Lorelei Lingard for 4 years, first as a part-time research assistant through the University of Toronto’s Wilson Centre, next as a full-time research associate at the Centre for Education Research & Innovation, and today as a PhD student in the Faculty of Health Science Department of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences. In the medical education research universe, Lorelei is the sun: faculty gravitate toward her ability to support their research, residents are drawn to her ability to connect them with ongoing medical education and surgical education research projects, and graduate students gravitate toward her brilliance, positivity, and poise. She is the best possible ambassador for graduate and post-graduate education at the Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry and worthy for consideration for the Distinguished Leader Award.  

When I met Lorelei, I was in the second year of my Masters degree. Although she was a researcher with a major international profile, she welcomed me onto one of her research projects with kindness and understanding. Being so novice, I was intimidated by her confident, expert approach to a research project involving residents’ comfort-levels with end-of-life care communication. While I could tell Lorelei was extremely busy, I left each meeting with her feeling empowered that I was capable of contributing to her research program and inspired that I was collaborating with someone so generous and knowledgeable.  

As luck would have it, Lorelei was hiring a full-time research associate to begin working with her at Western University at the time I completed my Masters degree. As the successful candidate, I have seen first-hand the impact she is having on the medical education community at Western. I have had the privilege of seeing her work with residents and faculty who come to her with problems and leave with research questions. She never declines to consult with any faculty or student, regardless of their level of understanding of research methods or the stage of development of their research project. Further, no matter how busy she is, she never cancels meetings with her colleagues. Lorelei enables the residents, students and faculty she works with to transform their half-baked ideas into feasible, rigorous, research programs–often projects that end up being funded! She is an inspiration to me, her colleagues, and the students and faculty who work with her.  

I am routinely reminded by others of how fortunate I am to have Lorelei as my PhD supervisor. One colleague has confided in me that they have received more mentorship working with Lorelei for two months than they received from supervisors during their entire doctorate. A recent visiting researcher from [outside Canada] told me that she received more face-time with Lorelei in three weeks than she had received from her doctoral supervisor in six months. These are two simple anecdotes from dozens I’ve observed during my years working with Lorelei. 

Lorelei is world-renowned for her research, but her graduate mentorship, post-graduate student mentorship, and faculty development deserve recognition. I sincerely hope you will select her as the top candidate for this award.

5 years past but the words ring true today. Congratulations (again), Lorelei!

Sincerely,

Allan

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